OTE Protein System

Use our OTE Protein Calculator to see how much protein you need and how you can fit this into your daily diet… Read more about protein

The Calculator

120g of protein per day recommended. View alternative foods
Breakfast Porridge with ½ pint of milk plus a yogurt 20g
Snack Yogurt or a duo bar 10g
Lunch 3 egg omelette 20g
Snack 50g of nuts 20g
Dinner 150g chicken or fish 40g
Supper Hot chocolate 10g
Total = 120g = Hover for vegetarian alternative
140g of protein per day recommended. View alternative foods
Breakfast Porridge with ½ pint of milk pand 2 scrambled eggs 30g
Snack Yogurt or a duo bar 10g
Lunch 3 egg omelette with 75g of cheese 40g
Snack Yogurt or a duo bar 10g
Dinner 150g chicken or fish 40g
Supper Hot chocolate 10g
Total = 140g = Hover for vegetarian alternative
160g of protein per day recommended. View alternative foods
Breakfast Porridge with ½ pint of milk plus a yogurt and 2 scrambled eggs 40g
Snack Yogurt or a duo bar 10g
Lunch 3 egg omelette with a small tin of tuna 40g
Snack Yogurt or a duo bar 10g
Dinner 200g chicken or fish 50g
Supper Hot chocolate 10g
Total = 160g = Hover for vegetarian alternative
  • Active person defined as someone who exercises 6 plus hours a week.
  • You can swap and change where the protein comes from (see some alternatives from the tables) the important thing is ensuring you achieve your diary protein intake.
  • Those taking part in ultra endurance events or heavy training schedules may require nearer 2g/kg/bw of protein.
  • Ensuring your protein intake is spread throughout the day is more beneficial for the body.
  • Rememeber protein is only part of a balance diet and you also need to consume carbohydrate, fats and fruit and vegetables to maintain health and performance.

About Protein

As active individuals we have long understood the importance of carbohydrate to fuel our swim, bike or run. Recently there has been a greater understanding of the importance of protein, not only for world class elite athletes but also for the recreational exerciser.

Protein has many roles within our bodies ranging from post exercise recovery to even playing a key part in weight management. Protein is made up of building blocks called amino acids, the different combinations of amino acids supply our bodies with different functions. This makes protein pretty unique as it can be used to build muscle and bone as well as being used as an energy source.

Research has shown that active people require more protein as part of their normal daily diet. Consuming around 1.75g per kilogram of body weight per day will enable you to gain the benefits that protein has to offer. Sport and exercise can place high demands on your body, to be able to perform at your best your body needs the right ingredients; taking on board the correct daily amount of protein is important in helping you maintain your performance.

For those nearing the age of 40 protein can be particularly important. Loss of muscle mass begins around this age and accelerates after the age of 75. Supplementing your diet with high-quality protein and participating in resistance training can help prevent muscle loss as you age.

For a more in depth guide to protein read our blog post here.

Ready reckoner of protein foods

Food portions containing approximately 20 grams of animal protein.

Animal source Approx weight Handy measure
Beef, lamb, pork 75g 3oz 2 medium slices
Turkey, chicken 75g 3oz 1 small breast
Liver 100g 4oz 2 tablespoons
Grilled fish 100g 4oz 1 small fillet
Beef, lamb, pork 75g 3oz 2 medium slices
Salmon, tuna 100g 4oz 1 small tin
Sardines 100g 4oz 1 small tin
Shrimps, prawns 100g 4oz 2 tablespoons
Cockles 200g 8oz 4 tablespoons
Eggs - - 3 medium
Cheddar cheese 75g 3oz 2 matchbox sized pieces
Edam cheese 150g 6oz 2 matchbox sized pieces
Cottage cheese 150g 6oz 4 tablespoons
Yoghurt (low fat) 400ml 16floz 3 cartons
Milk (skimmed / semi-skimmed) 600ml 24floz 1 pint
Soya milk 600ml 24floz 1 pint

Food portions containing approximately 10 grams of vegetable protein.

Vegetable source Approx weight Handy measure
Quinoa 300g 12oz 10 tablespoons (cooked)
Nuts (eg. peanuts, cashews) 50g 2oz 1 medium packet
Seeds (eg. sunflower, sesame) 500g 24oz 4 tablespoons
Baked beans 210g 8oz 4 tablespoons or ½ a large tin
Kidney beans, split peas 150g 6oz 5 tablespoons (cooked)
Lentils 150g 6oz 5 tablespoons (cooked)
Tofu (soya bean curd) 125g 5oz ½ packet
Soya milk 350ml 14floz ⅔ pint
Hummous 125g 5oz 3 tablespoons
Peanut butter 50g 2oz Thickly spread on 2 slices of bread
Bread 125g 5oz 4 large slices
Pasta, noodles 250g 10oz 8 tablespoons (cooked)
Rice 450g 18oz 12 tablespoons (cooked)
Cornflakes 100g 4oz 2 large bowls
Rice Krispies 150g 6oz 3 large bowls
Weetabix 100g 4oz 5 Weetabix
Digestive biscuits 100g 4oz 7 biscuits
Semi-sweet biscuits 150g 6oz 6–8 biscuits

References
McCance R.A.,Widdowson, E.M.(1991). TheCompositionof Foods, RSC Crawley, H. (1988). Food Portion Sizes. H.M.S.O.

Our Favourite High-Protein Products